What’s in the Plenary?

Plenary – Monday 14:00-15:30

WELCOME ADDRESS

Welcome to RIPE 61
Rob Blokzijl, RIPE Chair

Welcome to the 61st RIPE Meeting, includes an opening address by NaMeX and CASPUR Consortium, our meeting hosts.

Duration: 10 mins

PANEL DISCUSSION

Additional Path Data for Faster Convergence
Randy Bush, Keyur Patel, Virginie Van den Schrieck, Pierre Francois

Duration: 50 minutes

PRESENTATION

10 Gbit Hardware Packet Filtering Using Commodity Network Adapters
Luca Deri

Duration: 30 minutes

Plenary – Monday 16:00-18:00

PRESENTATION

RIPE Atlas
Daniel Karrenberg, RIPE NCC

An introduction to the RIPE NCC massive active measurement platform
http://labs.ripe.net/atlas

Duration: 30 minutes

PRESENTATION

IPv6 Deployment Monitoring Survey 2010
Maarten Botterman, GNKS Consult

Duration: 15 minutes

PANEL DISCUSSION

RIR/NRO Updates

Duration: 75 minutes

Plenary – Tuesday 09:00-10:30

PANEL DISCUSSION

Network Complexity
Michael Behringer

Ahead of this presentation, Michael invites network operators to complete a short anonymous survey. The results will be shared during the session.

Duration: 70 minutes

PRESENTATION

The Battle of the Optics
Markus Arnold

(Re)programming SFPs

Duration: 20 minutes

Plenary – Tuesday 11:00-12:30

PRESENTATION

Economic Incentives for Cooperation to Fight Spam
John Quarterman

Duration: 30 minutes

PRESENTATION

Gbps Open Source Routing
Bengt Gördén, Resilans AB

We have shown how open-source routers on new PC hardware allows for forwarding speeds of 10Gb/s and above. We have also shown how the new 10Gb/s interface classification techniques can be used to separate packet forwarding from control plane operation. It is important to isolate the control-plane from forwarding load, since it makes routing protocol and management operation independent of forwarding load. It also increases the resilience against denial-of-service attacks.

Duration: 30 minutes

PRESENTATION

L2/L3 Integration
Nicolas Fischbach, COLT

  • Colt today: Three separate networks
  • Why collapse L2 & L3 onto one network? – Technical and business benefits
  • L2 & L3 integration phases and challenges – Access (CPE), edge and core
  • Approach change on Internet transport vs transport over IP
  • Security aspects of L2/L3 integration
  • The dual-vendor requirement – A general strategy for business risk mitigation
  • The OSS & BSS environments – Service delivery, service activation and service assurance
  • Progress review of the Colt L2 & L3 integration project
  • The next step – L1/L2/L3 integration

Duration: 30 minutes

Plenary – Tuesday 14:00-15:30

PRESENTATION/Q&A

Best Practices in Network Planning and Traffic Engineering
Thomas Telkmap (Cariden), Clarence Filsfils (Cisco), Paolo Lucente (pmacct)

This presentation will review current industry best practises for planning and traffic engineering in IP and MPLS networks. Technologies and approaches will be compared, leveraging experience gained and case studies including a number of Tier 1 deployments. The subjects covered will include:

  • Traffic/demand matrices: Methods for determining traffic matrices for IP/MPLS networks
  • NetFlow, MPLS, demand estimation, demand deduction
  • pmacct NetFlow collector
  • The relationship between SLAs and network planning targets
  • Network planning simulation and analysis – working and failure cases, what-if scenarios
  • Traffic Engineering options and approaches: tactical, strategic, MPLS, IGP
  • IPFRR LFA analysis
  • Planning IP-over-Optical networks

Duration: 90 minutes

Plenary – Friday 09:00-10:30

PRESENTATION

“Crap” Traffic in IPv6
Geoff Huston
Duration: 20 minutes

PRESENTATION

IPv6 – A Content Provider’s Experiment
Johannes Endres

Content providers are reluctant to offer their services via dual stack servers. Some just lack interest, others fear to cut off users with broken IPv6. To assess the risk, Heise Online, a major German IT news site ran dual stack for 24 hours. This talk presents the preparations, results and a plan for dual stack deployment.

Duration: 30 minutes

PRESENTATION

Application Layer Traffic Optimisation (IETF-ALTO) Technologies in Service Provider Networks
Stefano Previdi

In today’s applications, caching and replication is a vital mechanism in order to provide redundancy, availability and efficiency in content and services delivery. Therefore it becomes critical to have a reliable and efficient mechanism allowing to determine the best location where data/services are to be delivered from and based on multiple criteria: location of the requesting user, infrastructure and resources utilsation, state and performance, policies, etc.

The Network Positioning System (NPS) computes the location of and distance between endpoints. Examples are: an application client willing to locate the closest instance of a movie, a peer-to-peer client willing to find the closest set of peers sharing the requested content, a voice/video conferencing service having to locate the closest bridge for a given user or a cloud computing network willing to locate the closest set of requested resources. NPS leverages network layer information and is operated by the Service Provider willing to deliver NPS services to the application layer.

NPS technology is aligned with the work IETF ALTO (Application Layer Traffic Optimisation) working group that carries the standardisation of a protocol through which ALTO services will be delivered to applications.

The presentation gives an overview on:

  • NPS Architecture and applicability
  • Implementation and deployment on Service Provider’s infrastructure
  • Future directions

Duration: 40 minutes


Closing Plenary

PRESENTATION

RIPE Meeting Technical Report
Erik Romijn

Duration: 10 mins

PRESENTATION

Closing Address
Rob Blokzijl, RIPE Chair
Duration: 15 mins

Further reports from RIPE 61 Working Group sessions and other items will be added during the meeting week.